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A good book...

History of the Brewing Industry and Brewing Science in America
by John P. Arnold
Price: $19.45



Antique Beer Photos:



Dozens of prints available in a variety of sizes up to 40x50.

Brewing in America in 1879.

Beer-making in America was at a crucial turning point in 1879. The post-civil war brewery boom was nearly at its peak, German immigration into America was soaring, and most major cities in America boasted dozens of breweries. But, a period of great change was just around the corner. Beginning in earnest in the 1880s, widespread mechanization and expanding railroads gave rise to the era of the "Beer Barons." Small, neighborhood breweries began to disappear in the shadows of the brewery giants. Though nationwide beer production rose dramatically, the number of operating breweries declined. It was the beginning of a trend which would last nearly a century.

Take a look at some random, but interesting, facts about brewing in 1879, —

(Data gleaned from F.W. Salem's 1880 book, Beer, Its History and Its Economic Value as a National Beverage.)

• An amazing 2,520 breweries were operating in the U.S. in 1879.

• The beer production of U.S. breweries totaled 10,848,194 barrels (31 gallons per barrel) for the year ending May 1, 1879. Today, Anheuser-Busch alone produces more than eight-times that amount.

• New York, with 365 breweries, was the largest beer-producing state in 1879. New York City supported about 75 breweries.

• Pennsylvania was the second largest beer-producing state with 317 breweries.

• The only states/territories which did not have at least one operating brewery in 1879 were Florida, Mississippi, and Oklahoma.

• In 1879, the nation's largest brewery (George Ehret's Hell Gate Brewery) made only about 1.5 percent of the country's beer. Today, the largest brewer (Anheuser-Busch) makes more than 40 percent of the beer brewed in America.

The twenty largest U.S. brewers in 1879 were:

RANKBREWERCITYBARRELS SOLD
1George EhretNew York180,152
2Philip Best (later Pabst)Milwaukee167,974
3Bergner & EngelPhiladelphia124,860
4Joseph SchlitzMilwaukee110,832
5Conrad SeippChicago108,347
6P. Ballantine & SonsNewark106,091
7Jacob RuppertNew York105,713
8Christian MorleinCincinnati93,337
9H. Clausen & SonNew York89,992
10William J. LempSt. Louis88,714
11Flanagan & WallaceNew York84,825
12Anheuser-BuschSt. Louis83,160
13Peter DoelgerNew York80,000
14Beadleston & WoerzNew York78,093
15Boston Beer CompanyBoston77,232
16Albany Brewing CompanyAlbany71,568
17Clausen & PriceNew York69,271
18Downer & BemisChicago66,878
19George RinglerNew York65,658
20Windisch-MulhauserCincinnati62,157

Source: Salem, F.W., BEER, ITS HISTORY AND ITS ECONOMIC VALUE AS A NATIONAL BEVERAGE. Hartford: F.W. Salem & Co., 1880.


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